Précis

TOPIC:

HOW AMERICAN CULTURE INFLUENCES STUDENTS TO LEAD DEPRESSED AND ANXIOUS LIVES

 

  • Seaman, B. (2005). Binge : What your college student won’t tell you : Campus life in an age of disconnection and excess. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.
    • In his book “Binge” (2005), Barrett Seaman asserts that college students are up against a lot more than meets the eye. Seaman “conveys the unprecedented stresses on campus today as well as the sense of isolation students feel from the “real world” and often from each other”. Seaman’s purpose is to illustrate how “isolation, sexual confusion, date rape, stress, and emotional problems” all contribute to the mental health of students in American Universities. The tone is centered around informing readers of the hidden truths of universities that aren’t apparent, audience being parents of young people and their peers.

 

  • Lukianoff, G., & Haidt, J. (2018). The coddling of the american mind : How good intentions and bad ideas are setting up a generation for failure. New York: Penguin Press. (2018). Retrieved March 3, 2019, from PSU Library Database
    • In their book The coddling of the american mind : How good intentions and bad ideas are setting up a generation for failure. (2018), Greg Lukianoff and Jonathan Haidt argues that safetyism is interfering with young people’s social, emotional, and intellectual development. The author’s insinuate that due to social constructs that have been beaten into the brain’s of young people for age’s in America, which would be “What doesn’t kill you makes you weaker; Always trust your feelings; and Life is a battle between good people and evil people.” The author’s purpose is to  explain how these “un-truth’s contradict basic psychological principles about well being and ancient wisdom from many cultures”, how they spread through social trends and lead to anxiety and depression within young people. The text identifies how changing conditions on campus, the increasing corporatization of their universities and the exposure of new ideas about self identity and their voice in society. The tone is directed toward people coming of college age, their parents and the social psychology field.

 

  • Ketchen Lipson, S., Gaddis, S. M., Heinze, J., Beck, K., & Eisenberg, D. (2015). Variations in Student Mental Health and Treatment Utilization Across US Colleges and Universities. Journal of American College Health, 63(6), 388–396. https://doi-org.libproxy.plymouth.edu/10.1080/07448481.2015.1040411
    • In an article “Variations in Student Mental Health and Treatment Utilization Across US Colleges and Universities”(2015) from the Journal of American College Health the author’s Lipson et al, argue that mental health issues seem to be increasing, and are widely untreated. The authors assert that although the prevalence of mental health issues along with the knowledge of them is relatively high, the utilization of resources to combat their mental health issues is seldom used by some. The purpose of the study was to identify which institutional characteristics are associated with certain mental health issues. The audience is psychological, sociological and social psychological fields and experts trying to identify trends so the problem can be isolated and improved, however they found that evidence on a wide scale of college undergraduates has much variation.
  • Ariel Shensa, Jaime E. Sidani, César G. Escobar-Viera, Kar-Hai Chu, Nicholas D. Bowman, Jennifer M. Knight & Brian A. Primack (2018) Real-life closeness of social media contacts and depressive symptoms among university students, Journal of American College Health, 66:8, 747-753, DOI: 10.1080/07448481.2018.1440575 https://doi-org.libproxy.plymouth.edu/10.1080/07448481.2018.1440575
    • In the article “Real-life closeness of social media contacts and depressive symptoms among university students” (2018) from the Journal of American College Health, authors Shensa et al, are arguing that social media contacts that are not known in person are attributing to depressive symptoms. The authors claim that because social media contacts are largely not known on a face to face basis, this is reason for depression because of the lack of personal connections. The researchers used “multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between real-life closeness of social media contacts and depressive symptoms.” The purpose of this study in retrospect is to examine the comparison between people who are depressed with high amounts of social media contacts not known in person, alongside those who aren’t depressed who do have many contacts on social media that they know in real life. The article is written in the tone of addressing young people, college students of course and social psychologists.

 

  • Cottle, M. (1999). Selling Shyness. (Cover story). New Republic, 221(5), 24–29. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=2035877&site=ehost-live&authtype=sso&custid=plymouth
    • This cover story titled “Selling Shyness” (1999) by Michelle Cottle from the New Republic Journal argues that neglected anxiety disorders are reason for social phobia in American society. The author asserts that due to the fear of being rejected by society over years and years, humans are programmed to not want to speak up due to fear of being embarrassed or ridiculed. The purpose of this article is to identify research done by Michael Liebowitz and “the key element of social phobia” and to apply it to neglected cases extreme anxiety disorder and evaluate how that plays a major role in millions of Americans lives. The audience are professionals from the fields of psychology, sociology and social psychology, along with those in the field of mental health services.

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